French Quarter Flavors

If you’re a guest returning to Pappadeaux, then welcome back. If you’re new to
the exciting flavors of the Vieux Carré, then you’re in for a great dining
experience. Our skilled chefs create menus using some of the most exciting
flavors and best ingredients in American cuisine.

Andouille:

Cajun sausage made from pork and other spicy meat and tossed with crawfish, crimini mushrooms and linguini, in a marinara cream sauce topped with jumbo grilled shrimp to make up Pappadeaux's Pasta Mardi Gras.

Beignet:

A deep fried doughnut.

Bisque:

A popular thick stew, roux based, made with crawfish or lobster available at Pappadeaux by the bowl or cup.

Boudin:

Light brown in color, one of the more popular Cajun sausages made with dirty rice and pork meat. Eating cracklings with boudin was almost a must or with cush cush and syrup. Try it as an appetizer next time you're at Pappadeaux.

Crawfish:

A small red crustacean that resembles a lobster and is the base of many famous and delicious Cajun dishes.

Dirty Rice:

Pan-fried leftover cooked rice sauteed with onion, celery, green peppers, ground beef, chicken, pork, stock, and many other ingredients.

étouffée:(ay-too-fay)

A succulent, tangy tomato-based sauce. A smothered dish usually made with crawfish or shrimp. Crawfish and Shrimp etouffee are New Orleans and Cajun country specialties.

Foundeaux:(fon-doo)

A thick, rich cheese based spread perfected at Pappadeaux Seafood Kitchen perfect for dipping garlic bread. Made with blackened shrimp and crawfish and can be served with oysters.

Fricassee:(Free-kay-say)

A stew made by browning then removing meat from the pan, making a roux with the pan drippings, and then returning meat to simmer in the thick gravy.

Frog Legs:

Not just for jumpin', these meaty croakers taste just like chicken when fried up wth a butter and a little breading.

Gator:

What's left after the boots are made, the alligator makes a tender and juicy nugget similar to a chicken nugget. Breaded and fried, the kids will love 'em dipped in some creole dipping sauce.

Gumbo:

Called a "brown soup", gumbos are roux based and are made with Andouille sausage, shrimp, seafood or any combination can be used to make gumbo at Pappadeaux.

Roux:

The most classic Cajun creation made by cooking flour and oil together. The popular phrase, "First you make a roux" is used to create dishes such as gumbo, fricassee stews, courtbouillion, and sauce piquant, even spaghetti sauce and other dishes.

Visite':

An afternoon visit spent with family or friends passing around the coffe, the news and the latest stories. See you for a visite' soon.

Po-Boy:

A sandwich extravaganza that began as a five-cent lunch for poor boys. Always made with French bread, po-boys can be stuffed with fried oysters, shrimp, fish, crawfish, and or any combination.

Praline:(praw-leen)

The sweetest of the sweets, this New Orleans tradition is a candy patty made of sugar, cream and pecans. Try Pappadeaux's famous, home-made Praline Cheesecake for a special treat.

Sauce Piquante:(saws-pee-kwant)

Means "spicy sace"; is a spicy stew.

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How to Eat Gulf Oysters

Step 1: LOOSEN MEAT

With oyster fork, loosen meat from the shell

Step 2: ADD FLAVOR

Add a dash of tabasco, lemon or cocktail sauce.

Step 3: TIP HEAD BACK

Raise shell to mouth, tip head and shell back until oyster slides off.
Repeat until full.

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How to Eat Boild Crawfish

Step 1: PULL OFF THE TAIL

Grasp crawfish head in one hand, tail in the other. Twist and pull off the tail.

Step 2: PEEL OFF RINGS

Peel off first two rings of the shell from the tail.

Step 3: PINCH END OF TAIL

Pinch the end of the tail, pull meat out.

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How to Eat Whole Lobster

Step 1: SEPARATE TAIL

After breaking off the claws, Tightly grasp lobster, twist to separate tail from the back.

Step 2: BREAK'EM OFF

Break off small flippers at the end of the tail.

Step 3: PUSH IT OUT

Push the tail meat out intact through the other end.

Byenvenu

Translation:
Byenvenu is how we say 'Welcome' in Louisiana Creole.

Example:
Byenvenu to the Pappadeaux website!

Ain?

Translation:
what did you say?

Example:
Ain? Mais, I can't hear whatchu said.

An ahnvee

Translation:
a longing or hunger (French "envie")

Example:
I got an ahnvee for some boudin.

Beb

Translation:
sweetheart, darling

Example:
beb, lets go visit mama.

Boude'

Translation:
pout, be angry (French "bouder")

Example:
He boude'd all day for not being able to go to de show.

Choooh or
Coooh or
Ga Lee

Translation:
(expression of astonishment)

Example:
Coooh luk at da size o dat crawfish! Ga lee look at de size o dat gator!

Coo-yôn

Translation:
fool, foolish, stupid (French "couillon")

Example:
Dôn be coo-yôn! Come to Pappadeaux today!

Dôn Matta

Translation:
doesn't matter

Example:
Whatcha goin eat? Dat dôn matta at all. Everting onda Pappadeaux menu’s great!

Pod nah

Translation:
partner, companion, good friend

Example:
I went fishing with my pod nah, Tee Jim.

Tee (masculine) or Teet (feminine)

Translation:
small or junior (French petit or petite)

Example:
I went to town with tee Joe.

Tooloulou

Translation:
fiddler crab

Example:
Look at that tooloulou running across de beach.

Vay-yay

Translation:
spend time talking (French veiller)

Example:
He went vay-yay with his friends at da Pappadeaux bar.

Costeau

Translation:
Male crab

Example:
Pappadeaux uses many costeau in their dishes.

Patate

Translation:
Potato

Example:
Pappadeaux uses thousands of pounds of patate every year.

Ca c'est bon

Translation:
That's good! (Sa say bohn)

Example:
Every time I bite into lobster at Pappadeaux I think – Ca c’est bon!

Lahn yop

Translation:
A little something extra (Lahn yop)

Example:
Pappadeaux always gives us some lagniappe

Bonjour Mes Amis

Translation:
Good day my friends.

Example:
Bonjour mes amis!

Deaux Deaux

Translation:
Sleep or nap [dough dough]

Example:
After a big meal at Pappadeaux, I go home for a deaux deaux.

Laissez les bons temps rouler!

Translation:
Let the good times roll! [lay zay lay bons tom roo lay]

Example:
Laissez les bons temps rouler at Pappadeaux!